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dc.contributor.authorMoore, Cameron
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-30T01:12:40Z
dc.date.available2021-03-30T01:12:40Z
dc.date.issued2021-03-18
dc.identifier.issn2463-4190
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/5242
dc.description.abstractIt has been eight years, or nearly two generations of students, since the last classical studio was run at Unitec. In the six-week vertical studio, the students got a valuable addendum to their regular design studio education. The point of departure from contemporary studio is the absolute reliance on formal architectural precedent in the students’ design methodology and consequently, their final presentations. The primary learning objective was not necessarily how to design a classical building, but the experience of designing in a paradigm where explicit formal references were demanded, not as a starting point, but as an integral part of the design process. After the site analysis and understanding the functional and spatial requirements of the brief, every other decision the student makes could be – or at a beginner’s level, should be – informed by an architectural canon established 4500 years ago that has since spread to all continents. This paper reflects on an alternative approach of design studio teaching at the Unitec School of Architecture. As the only architecture school in New Zealand that has run a classical studio, it can be een as a point of difference with the other architecture schools, and indeed a confirmation of Unitec’s ‘real-world learning’ philosophyen_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUnitec ePressen_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen_NZ
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectUnitec Institute of Technology (Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectdesign studio educationen_NZ
dc.subjectarchitecture educationen_NZ
dc.subjectUnitec coursesen_NZ
dc.subjectarchitecture studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectclassical architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectdesign practiceen_NZ
dc.titleIf you copy, you will be caught and a mess will remain : the role of formal precedent in Design Studioen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2021-03-29T13:30:19Z
dc.rights.holderAuthoren_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130103 Higher Educationen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120199 Architecture not elsewhere classifieden_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMoore, C.S. (2020). If You Copy, You will Be Caught and a Mess Will Remain: The Role of Formal Precedent in Design Studio. Aslyum, 2020/4, 154-163.en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage154en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage163en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume4en_NZ
unitec.publication.issue4en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleAslyum 2020en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleAsylum 2020en_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms65305en_NZ
unitec.relation.epresshttps://www.unitec.ac.nz/epress/index.php/asylum-2020-4-4/en_NZ
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7812-8341en_NZ
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaArchitectureen_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaArchitecture


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