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dc.contributor.authorTuitama, Rosalind Fuailelagi
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-15T20:53:29Z
dc.date.available2020-09-15T20:53:29Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4978
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTIONS: 1. What are Pasifika parents and caregivers perspectives on the access and use of digital technologies? 2. What are Pasifika parents and caregivers beliefs about using digital technologies at school and the connections with home learning? 3. How do Pasifika parents and caregivers view digital technologies and the impact on family life and cultural responsibilities? ABSTRACT: 21st Century education now requires students to learn using digital technologies. This allows for learning to occur any place and at any time. This requirement, however, involves access to the internet and digital devices in order for learning to continue beyond the classroom. This study investigates perspectives of Pasifika parents and caregivers from low-socio communities and the impact of digital technologies on children’s education, family and culture. Using talanoa qualitative methods within the Teu Le Va construct, allowed participants to talanoa through semi-structured interviews. Ten parents and caregivers of Pasifika descent namely from the Cook Islands, Tonga, Samoa, Niue and Fiji took part in the study. The data analysis revealed three key themes: (1) Disconnections of parents/caregivers within cyberspace from their children; digital exclusions because of access and skill (2) Reconnections to disadvantaged traditions with traditional inequalities and (3) Interconnections of parents/caregivers with digital technologies and how they currently navigate the digital space. Recommendations are made for equitable access for families in low-socio communities around wifi and digital devices. The importance of upskilling parents and caregivers from these communities so that they remain connected with their children in cyberspace and the digital economy. The need for schools to review how parents and caregivers are involved in creating culturally responsive pathways in children’s digital learning.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/*
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectPasifika parentsen_NZ
dc.subjectPasifika caregiversen_NZ
dc.subjectdigital divideen_NZ
dc.subjectdigital accessen_NZ
dc.subjectaccessen_NZ
dc.subjectdigital literacyen_NZ
dc.subjecte-colonizeen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial cohesionen_NZ
dc.subjectinternet accessen_NZ
dc.subjectperspectivesen_NZ
dc.subjectdigital inclusionen_NZ
dc.subjecttalanoa (traditional method of face-to-face conversations)en_NZ
dc.subjectPasifika studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectPasifika
dc.titleDigital spaces : Pasifika parents and caregivers talanoa on the impact of digital technologiesen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Applied Practiceen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130311 Pacific Peoples Educationen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130306 Educational Technology and Computingen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTuitama, R. F. (2020). Digital spaces : Pasifika parents and caregivers talanoa on the impact of digital technologies. (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Practice). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4978en
unitec.pages125en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuTāngata o Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwaen_NZ
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalMane, Jo
unitec.advisor.associatedTominiko, Falaniko


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand