Show simple record

dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Chris
dc.contributor.editorIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Scien
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-08T02:03:00Z
dc.date.available2020-05-08T02:03:00Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-01
dc.identifier.issn1755-1315
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4925
dc.description.abstractThe damage caused by the 2011 Christchurch earthquake has led to the introduction of compulsory seismic strengthening legislation for all unreinforced earthquake-prone masonry buildings (URM) within New Zealand. The legislation, passed in 2013, requires all such URM commercial, multi-unit and multi-storey residential buildings to be upgraded and strengthened to a minimum of 34% or more of the New Building Standard, irrespective of the earthquake zone within which they are located. Buildings so designated and in high earthquake zones will have a very limited time bring their buildings into line with these requirements. The proposal particularly affects old URM buildings. Some of these are buildings have a declared heritage value, many do not. Most were built around the turn of the twentieth Century. Together they make up a considerable portion of many small town commercial precincts. The legislation affects all parts of New Zealand, regardless of the particular region’s exposure to earthquake risk. The paper will background the current legislation, compare international legislation and study the financial effects of the legislation, case studying buildings within two distinct seismic zones. The findings suggest that where the cost of the upgrade puts the viability of the building as a rental investment at risk, the owner will most likely adopt demolition is the only feasible outcome. This could have far-reaching implications for the wellbeing of many small towns within New Zealand. An alternative strategy is examined and assesseden_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherIOP Publishingen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/410/1/012106en_NZ
dc.rightsContent from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.en_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectearthquake prone buildingsen_NZ
dc.subjectunreinforced brick masonry retail buildings (URM)en_NZ
dc.subjectBuilding (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill 2013en_NZ
dc.subjectconstruction technologyen_NZ
dc.titleNew Zealand's unreinforced masonry buildings : facing up to the earthquake.en_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.date.updated2020-03-28T13:30:12Z
dc.rights.holder© Copyright 2020 IOP Publishingen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservationen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMurphy, C P. (2019). New Zealand's Unreinforced Masonry Buildings: Facing up to the Earthquake. In IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (Ed.), SBE 19 Sustainability in the built environment for climate change mitigation. Thessiloniki, 23-25 October 2019 , Vol. 401, Sci 410 012106 (pp. n/a). Retrieved from https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1755-1315/410/1/012106en_NZ
unitec.publication.spagen/aen_NZ
unitec.publication.volume401, Sci 410 012106en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Scienceen_NZ
unitec.conference.titleSBE 19 Sustainability in the built environment for climate change mitigation. Thessiloniki (2019)en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgInternational Initiative for a Sustainable Built Environment (iiSBE)en_NZ
unitec.conference.locationThessiloniki, Greeceen_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2019-10-23
unitec.conference.edate2019-10-25
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms64799en_NZ
unitec.publication.placeBristol, Englanden_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in

Show simple record