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dc.contributor.authorHaigh, David
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T20:33:50Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T20:33:50Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-24
dc.identifier.issn2423-009X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4909
dc.description.abstract“Poverty strikes dead the very souls of all who come within sight, sound or smell of it.” G.B. Shaw, Major Barbara This paper explores the popular and political myths and language used about poverty and those who are poor. These are viewed through three historical periods: the Victorian era, the period of the 1930s great depression and the contemporary world since neoliberalism took hold in the 1980s. Each period has its own language about those in poverty. The Victorians imposed a harsh system comprising transportation of poor petty criminals to the British colonies, and incarceration in workhouses for others. Writers and researchers such as George Bernard Shaw and Charles Booth deplored the cruelty of the workhouse system. The experiences of the unemployed during the depression were highlighted by Tony Simpson, and through articles and letters to the editor in local New Zealand newspapers. Contemporary thinkers such as Jonathan Boston and Susan St John continue to expose the myths of poverty and point to policies for a more benevolent system.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUnitec ePressen_NZ
dc.rightsLanguage and myths of poverty is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.en_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/*
dc.subjectpovertyen_NZ
dc.subjectmythsen_NZ
dc.subjectperceptionsen_NZ
dc.subjectnarrativesen_NZ
dc.subjecthistoryen_NZ
dc.subjectneoliberalismen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial policyen_NZ
dc.subjectGreat Depression (1929-1939)en_NZ
dc.subjectDepressions, 1929.en_NZ
dc.subjectcauses of povertyen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial inequalityen_NZ
dc.subjectwelfare policyen_NZ
dc.titleLanguage and myths of povertyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderUnitec ePressen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden160512 Social Policyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden209999 Language, Communication and Culture not elsewhere classifieden_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHaigh, D. (2020). Language and myths of poverty, Whanake: The Pacific Journal of Community Development, 5(1), 67–79. Unitec ePress. Retrieved from: http://www.unitec.ac.nz/epressen_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage67en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage69en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume5en_NZ
unitec.publication.issue1en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleWhanake: The Pacific Journal of Community Developmenten_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.relation.epresshttps://www.unitec.ac.nz/epress/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/Whanake5.1-Haigh-Language-and-myths.pdfen_NZ
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand