Show simple record

dc.contributor.authorHossain, Nayla Mehvish
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-04T22:45:11Z
dc.date.available2020-02-04T22:45:11Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4844
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: How can an architectural intervention assist in integrating refugees into Auckland society? ABSTRACT: New Zealand is one of 44 nations that are a part of the UNHCR treaty, that looks to give 1000 refugees a new life each year. In this new life, however, Refugees are in displacement and struggle to integrate into society. Our country has made means to provide basic facilities and skills for communication, yet these skills are taught in an isolated area away from the public. This proposal aims to integrate refugees by extracting their needs while in the resettlement process. It will explore further interventions that will help refugees integrate by gaining confidence and stability. Current refugee resettlement processes will be reviewed to gain information on where this problem stems. We investigate examples of current refugee typologies, that will help to create an understanding of architecture that either restricts or achieves integration and to work towards it. The site of Mangere-East is proposed as it includes the existing Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre. The site is close to the centre, and the surrounding area has a multicultural population which helps the idea of resettling a multicultural group such as refugees. Refugee architecture globally is only limited to temporary spaces in forms of shelters and housing. These spaces have minimal functions that strip refugees to bare life. Refugees require integration to acquire an income that can support their families during the resettling process. Lack of integration and support causes refugees to develop psychological issues which develop from displacement and isolation. It further discourages them to live a happy and healthy life. The end result of this project hopes to bring a space where refugees and the local community can work together. The objective is to aid refugees to gain a sense of belonging and acceptance while also serving alongside the wider community of Mangere-East. The two groups will view each other as equal contributors to society, leading to acceptance. Architecture should not be restricting but rather providing and equal to every group.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectMangere East, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectMangere Refugee Resettlement Centre (Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectrefugeesen_NZ
dc.subjectrefugee resettlement centresen_NZ
dc.subjectresettlement challengesen_NZ
dc.subjectintegrationen_NZ
dc.subjectresettlement centresen_NZ
dc.titleOutside, In : design for integrationen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
dc.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technology, Aucklanden_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHossain, N. M. (2019). Outside, In : design for integration. (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4844en
unitec.pages155en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalMcConchie, Graeme
unitec.advisor.associatedJadresin-Milic, Renata


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in

Show simple record