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dc.contributor.authorde Langen, Beatrix
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-04T20:57:01Z
dc.date.available2019-09-04T20:57:01Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4679
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: How can the incremental growth of nature be used as a premise to govern new sustainable builds within the region of Auckland? ABSTRACT: Housing can no longer be considered a human right, and is steadily becoming a luxury few can afford. The effects of limited staged land release and an exponential rise in population within Auckland has contributed to one of the most significant and defining housing crises of the 21st century in New Zealand. With an unprecedented influx of people into Auckland, current housing practice and policies are inept and unable to meet demands in both housing quantity and affordability. Retention of the fixed and final master plan and house plan as a solution to the market’s demands is a strategy that needs reinvention to better suit the current, yet ever-changing society that is developing at unforeseen rates. This research project, “Incremental Extension”, addresses the limitations of housing, both historic and contemporary. Using nature as a tool, guide and overall influence, the architectural outcome seeks to represent a collation of several core attributes found within ecosystems and natural growth patterns. The research undergone will explore the possibilities of a walkable city, and the return to planning at a human scale through the prioritisation of the pedestrian and social capital within communities. The result of this research project is an architecture that allows an abundance of integrated growth and development options whilst retaining the unique feel of Warkworth and the overall value of architectural design. This is achieved through a sustainable and incremental expansion strategy derived from natural growth patterns of ecosystems. The strategy begins with the initial pre-fabricated architectural seed, consisting of a master bedroom, bathroom, and open plan living, kitchen and dining. The growth of this seed occurs through incremental additions of pre-fabricated wall panels slotted within a steel frame. Internally, as the seed/dwelling grows, a grid track system allows occupants to add, remove and modify existing partition walls, resulting in numerous room and furniture layouts. Overall the process and resulting architecture seeks to create opportunities for people of all social classes to satisfy ever-changing needs.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectWarkworth Show Grounds (N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectWarkworth, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjecthousing in Aucklanden_NZ
dc.subjectwalkabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectpedestrian experienceen_NZ
dc.subjectmedium-density housingen_NZ
dc.subjectcycle pathsen_NZ
dc.titleIncremental extensionen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120508 Urban Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationde Langen, B. (2017). Incremental extension (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4679en_NZ
unitec.pages107en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalHall, Min
unitec.advisor.associatedO'Connell, Ainsley


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