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dc.contributor.authorCamplin, Brita
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-30T00:04:41Z
dc.date.available2019-08-30T00:04:41Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4672
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: How can aspects from our coastal environment and history be considered to inform the architectonic design of Surf Life Saving facilities? ABSTRACT: As an island nation the ocean is an integral aspect of New Zealand’s culture and we enjoy being in, on and around our coastline waters. However, within the short time of European settlement, the respect and caution that the Maori ofNew Zealand once had for the ocean has diminished, and as a result loss of life due to drowning has become a nationwide dilemma. Organisations such as SurfLifesaving New Zealand dedicate their focus on reducing the number of drownings and aim to ensure our beaches are safe environments. Although the presence of the lifeguards assists in preventing drowning at New Zealand beaches, the majority of the public are unaware of the oceans strengths and therefore are at risk. An increase in education and awareness needs to be raised to ensure kiwis and tourists can interact with our coast in a safe and informed manner. This research project “Turning the Tide” addresses a limitation in current respect and awareness for the risks and dangers at New Zealand beaches. Architecture provides a possible solution in altering the current Surf Lifesaving Club typology to not only support means of rescue but also tackle the issue of education in water safety at the beach. The research will explore the possibility of integrating the architecture with both the beach environment and the visitors to the beach. An exploration into the unforgiving risks will assist in forming a space of education that can play an active role in restoring the awareness and respect for the potential dangers that come hand in hand with a visit to our coast.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectHot Water Beach (Coromandel Peninsula, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectCoromandel Peninsula, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectwater safetyen_NZ
dc.subjectbeach safetyen_NZ
dc.subjectsurf life saving facilitiesen_NZ
dc.subjectpatrol towersen_NZ
dc.subjectbeach safety education centresen_NZ
dc.subjectlifeguardingen_NZ
dc.subjectsurf clubhousesen_NZ
dc.titleTurning the tide : an architectural project addressing the urgent need for awareness and education on water safety at New Zealand beaches. An exploration of an educational portal to Hot Water Beachen_NZ
dc.title.alternativeTurning the tide : an exploration of an educational portal to Hot Water Beachen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden150404 Sport and Leisure Managementen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCamplin, B. (2017). Turning the tide: An architectural project addressing the urgent need for awareness and education on water safety at New Zealand beaches. An exploration of an educational portal to Hot Water Beach (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4672en_NZ
unitec.pages66en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalMcPherson, Peter
unitec.advisor.associatedPusateri, John


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