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dc.contributor.authorClayton, Natasha
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-20T02:13:46Z
dc.date.available2019-08-20T02:13:46Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4656
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: How can architecture benefit from a design process driven by sound investigations? ABSTRACT: This project is concerned with what R. Murray Shafer has termed the ‘soundscape’, the aural equivalent of a landscape. The design of such a soundscape has the potential to enrich both spatial qualities and the experience of architecture; however, the potential for this integration is not always fully utilised. Often, we see architecture manifest itself visually, with little attention to how other senses can be stimulated. This results in a disconnection between architectural intention and the way it is experienced. This project explores aural sensitivity through a method that questions the way a space is perceived and experienced. We notice a naturally close relationship between sound and architecture when buildings have the express purpose of housing music. Here, the relationship between sound quality and the architectural environment is obvious; however, the integration between space and sound occurs purely on a practical and programmatic level. It does not address the poetic potential of auditory phenomenology. In such a case, on one side the auditory quality becomes a narrow application of acoustics through a specific method that offers little flexibility in architecture. At the other end, the soundscape is not included in the process of design, as it is often unrecognised in the visually dominated discipline of architecture. In contrast to this narrow interpretation of the relationship between sound and architectural space, this project aims to understand the possibilities of the soundscape and its contribution to the quality of spatial experience. It does so through investigations and experiments with sound in architectural space. This project involves an exploration into an aural sensitive dimension in architecture and its effect on the human relation to space. The intent is to expand methods of design for architects and to bridge the gap between architecture and aural experience. PROJECT QUESTIONS: 1) How does the environment influence the perception and the interpretation of sound? 2) How does sound change our experience of the surrounding space?en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectMeoloa Reef Reserve (Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectsoundwalksen_NZ
dc.subjectnature walksen_NZ
dc.subjectwalkwaysen_NZ
dc.subjectarchitecture and sounden_NZ
dc.subjectauditory architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectacoustic architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectLeitner, Bernhard. Sound spacesen_NZ
dc.titleSpaces we hear : closing the gap between architecture and the soundscapeen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120107 Landscape Architectureen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120104 Architectural Science and Technology (incl. Acoustics, Lighting, Structure and Ecologically Sustainable Design)en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationClayton, N. (2018). Spaces we hear: Closing the gap between architecture and the soundscape (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4656en_NZ
unitec.pages78en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalSchnoor, Christoph
unitec.advisor.associatedBudgett, Jeanette


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