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dc.contributor.authorBarazanchi, Haroun
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-13T21:13:00Z
dc.date.available2019-03-13T21:13:00Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4554
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: How can passive climate control design methods be applied to a high-density mixed-use residential development to reflect cultural identity in hot-dry climate conditions? The recent interest in environmental sustainability for the rapid growth of urban centres in the Gulf emphasises the use of technological solutions to deal with the challenges caused by urbanisation. This is especially true for sub-tropical zones such as Doha, Qatar, where the revival of passive design solutions as a regional and vernacular approach, helps the discourse for the future of sustainable developments in the old downtown area of Doha. The capital city is experiencing the construction of a plethora of glass and concrete high-rise structures due to the cities recent global economic success. These structures highlight the use of active systems for cooling and heating the air tight towers ultimately disassociating the interior environment from the external climate. The strong ties between the industrial and technological sectors are indicators of global affluence, prompting environmental management groups to focus on the efficiency of active cooling/heating technology. This approach is seen as short sighted in subtropical regions. The research project will focus on, how can passive climate control design methods be applied to a high-density mixed-use residential development to reflect cultural identity in hot-dry climate conditions? The literature review of this project considers several design principles regarding passive climate control design and traditional design techniques. A general overview of the passive design principles and cultural considerations are explored as well as specific Qatari/Islamic design principles. The case studies examine the ideas explored in the literature review, such as Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi and Seef Lusail in Doha. The architectural design outcome will be a high-density mixed-use residential development that responds to the local climate conditions and cultural identity of Doha. The design will attempt to avoid the use of active systems, such as active heating/cooling systems, and rely on passive means to create climate comfort. The research will provide the tools to use climate information and translate this into formal solutions by means of qualitative data to respond to climate conditions. The result will achieve a revitalised residential area in Msherieb, connecting the past with the present using passive climate control in reference to traditional design techniques as a design driver.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectDoha, Qataren_NZ
dc.subjectMsheireb Downtown, Qataren_NZ
dc.subjectQataren_NZ
dc.subjecthigh density housingen_NZ
dc.subjecthigh rise buildingsen_NZ
dc.subjectmixed use building typesen_NZ
dc.subjectbuilding passive designen_NZ
dc.subjectheatingen_NZ
dc.subjectcoolingen_NZ
dc.subjectpassive designen_NZ
dc.subjectpassive climate controlen_NZ
dc.subjectQatari architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectindigenous perspectivesen_NZ
dc.titlePassive climate control for high-density buildings in Doha : using passive design methods in reference to the cultural identity of Doha in a high-density mixed-use and residential developmenten_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120202 Building Science and Techniquesen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBarazanchi, H. (2018). Passive climate control for high-density buildings in Doha : using passive design methods in reference to the cultural identity of Doha in a high-density mixed-use and residential development. (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4554en
unitec.pages90en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealand
unitec.advisor.principalBradbury, Matthew
unitec.advisor.associatedSu, Bin


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