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dc.contributor.authorEvans, Brian
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-29T21:34:02Z
dc.date.available2018-10-29T21:34:02Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4385
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTIONS: 1. What key values and strategies do Samoan and Tongan parents identify as supporting educational achievement for their children, with specific reference to boys? 2. What factors external to schools do Samoan and Tongan male students describe as influences on their academic achievement in secondary education? 3. In what ways do these external factors impact on academic and longer-term achievement of Samoan and Tongan males? 4. How can these factors be utilised to increase their impact on academic achievement of Samoan and Tongan males? The literature review for this study raised a serious concern that Pasifika males had poor achievement levels in New Zealand secondary schools. Although there was an improvement in the past decade, male Pasifika secondary students as a group, still lagged far behind their Pakeha or Asian counterparts. This research investigated the gap that still exists for Pasifika secondary school males. The aims of this study led to the four research questions that investigated the influences leading to positive educational outcomes for Samoan and Tongan males in New Zealand secondary education. An interpretive paradigm was adopted with a qualitative methodology. Multiple methods of interviews, focus groups and talanoa interviews provided the most appropriate research design to collect data related to the phenomenon of influences on Pasifika male secondary students. These three methods allowed the researcher to investigate a range of different perspectives with three cohorts (recent male Pasifika secondary school leavers, male Pasifika university graduates and Pasifika parents) to provide triangulation. Bourdieu’s (1977) theory of cultural capital was used as a relevant theoretical framework to explore the influences on the academic achievement of male Pasifika secondary students. These students operate within a number of different fields, including church, family, school and friends which all have the potential to provide positive influences during their secondary school education. It is the relationship between these different fields that can support male Pasifika secondary students to succeed academically. The findings showed that male Pasifika secondary students who had achieved academic success understood the sacrifice their families had made by migrating to New Zealand. For the participants of this study, strong influencing role models were provided by peers, school and family, while high expectations from home and school were seen as a positive motivating force. It was perceived as important for parents to understand the time commitment required to achieve at the highest levels of achievement and for families to allow their boys the space and time to study. A fai e te fia alu vave, alu naó oe, afai e te fia alu mamao o faátasi If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far go together (Samoan Proverb)en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectsecondary schoolsen_NZ
dc.subjectSamoan studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectTongan studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectmale pupilsen_NZ
dc.subjectmale studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectSamoans in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectTongans in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectacademic successen_NZ
dc.subjectstudent achievementen_NZ
dc.subjectsecondary studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectPasifikaen_NZ
dc.subjectBourdieu, Pierre (1930-2002)
dc.subjecttalanoa (traditional method of face-to-face conversations)
dc.titleAn examination of the complex web of influences on the educational achievement of Samoan and Tongan male students in Auckland secondary schoolsen_NZ
dc.typeDoctoral Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130311 Pacific Peoples Educationen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130106 Secondary Educationen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationEvans, B. (2018). An examination of the complex web of influences on the educational achievement of Samoan and Tongan male students in Auckland secondary schools. A thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Education), Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.pages211en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalHowse, Jo
unitec.advisor.associatedCardno, Carol


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