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dc.contributor.authorZito, S.
dc.contributor.authorAguilar, Glenn
dc.contributor.authorVigeant, S.
dc.contributor.authorDale, A.
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-12T22:36:46Z
dc.date.available2018-09-12T22:36:46Z
dc.date.issued2018-05-13
dc.identifier.issn2076-2615
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4358
dc.description.abstractSIMPLE SUMMARY: It is generally accepted that stray cats need to be managed to minimise the associated negative impacts and there is a need for effective and humane management tools. One such potential tool is trap-neuter-return (TNR), which anecdotally has been used in New Zealand to manage stray cats, but no concerted and targeted implementation of this technique has been reported, nor any formal assessments conducted. A targeted TNR (TTNR) programme for urban stray cats was implemented and assessed in one Auckland suburb. Assessment was based on the number of incoming felines; stray, unsocialised cats euthanased; unsocialised, unowned cats sterilised and returned (independently of the TTNR programme); and neonatal/underage euthanasias. Incoming stray feline, underage euthanasia, and unsocialised stray cat euthanasia numbers all reduced for the targeted suburb when these outcome measures were compared for the years before and after the programme. These outcome measures had a greater reduction in the targeted suburb compared to the other Auckland suburbs not targeted by the TTNR programme, although causation cannot be inferred, as a variety of reasons could have contributed to the changes. This pilot programme suggests that TTNR could be a valuable humane cat management tool in urban New Zealand, and further assessment is warranted. ABSTRACT: There is a need for effective and humane management tools to manage urban stray cats and minimise negative impacts associated with stray cats. One such tool is targeted trap-neuter-return (TTNR), but no concerted implementation of this technique or formal assessments have been reported. To address this deficit, a TTNR programme was implemented and assessed in one Auckland suburb from May 2015 to June 2016; the programme sterilised and returned 348 cats (4.2 cats/1000 residents). Assessment was based on the number of incoming felines; stray, unsocialised cats euthanased; unsocialised, unowned cats sterilised and returned (independently of the TTNR programme); and neonatal/underage euthanasias. Incoming stray felines, underage euthanasias, and unsocialised stray cat euthanasias were all reduced for the targeted suburb when compared for the years before and after the programme (the percentage reduction in these parameters was −39, −17, −34, −7, and −47, respectively). These outcome measures had a greater reduction in the targeted suburb compared to the Auckland suburbs not targeted by the TTNR programme (p < 0.01), although causation cannot be inferred, as a variety of reasons could have contributed to the changes. This pilot programme suggests that TTNR could be a valuable, humane cat management tool in urban New Zealand, and further assessment is warranted.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherMDPI (Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/8/5en_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).en_NZ
dc.subjecttrap-neuter-return (TNR)en_NZ
dc.subjecttargeted trap-neuter-returnen_NZ
dc.subjectcat managementen_NZ
dc.subjectunwanted catsen_NZ
dc.subjectshelter medicineen_NZ
dc.subjectstray catsen_NZ
dc.subjectsemi-owned catsen_NZ
dc.subjectanimal welfareen_NZ
dc.subjectshelter intakeen_NZ
dc.subjectshelter euthanasiaen_NZ
dc.subjectcats (Felis catus)en_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleAssessment of a targeted trap-neuter-return pilot study in Auckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-09-07T14:30:07Z
dc.subject.marsden070205 Animal Protection (Pests and Pathogens)en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden050211 Wildlife and Habitat Managementen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationZito, S., Aguilar, G., Vigeant, S., & Dale, A. (2018). Assessment of a Targeted Trap-Neuter-Return Pilot Study in Auckland, New Zealand. Animals, 8 (73), 1-22. doi:10.3390/ani8050073en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage1en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage22en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume8en_NZ
unitec.publication.issue73en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleAnimalsen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms62665en_NZ
unitec.publication.place(Basel, Switzerland)en_NZ


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