Show simple record

dc.contributor.authorShepherd, L.D.
dc.contributor.authorde Lange, Peter
dc.contributor.authorCox, S.
dc.contributor.authorMcLenachan, P.A.
dc.contributor.authorRoskruge, N.R.
dc.contributor.authorLockhart, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-20T02:17:27Z
dc.date.available2018-02-20T02:17:27Z
dc.date.issued2016-03-24
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4101
dc.description.abstractWe use chloroplast DNA sequencing to examine aspects of the pre-European Māori cultivation of an endemic New Zealand root crop, Arthropodium cirratum (rengarenga). Researching the early stages of domestication is not possible for the majority of crops, because their cultivation began many thousands of years ago and/or they have been substantially altered by modern breeding methods. We found high levels of genetic variation and structuring characterised the natural distribution of A. cirratum, while the translocated populations only retained low levels of this diversity, indicating a strong bottleneck even at the early stages of this species’ cultivation. The high structuring detected at four chloroplast loci within the natural A. cirratum range enabled the putative source(s) of the translocated populations to be identified as most likely located in the eastern Bay of Plenty/East Cape region. The high structuring within A. cirratum also has implications for the conservation of genetic diversity within this species, which has undergone recent declines in both its natural and translocated ranges. This study was funded by a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship from the Royal Society of New Zealand (contract number RDF-MNZ1201) to LDS and the Royal Society of New Zealand’s Marsden Fund (contract number MAU0709). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscripten_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLOS)en_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_NZ
dc.subjectBay of Plenty (New Zealand / Aotearoa)en_NZ
dc.subjectEast Cape (New Zealand / Aotearoa)en_NZ
dc.subjectArthropodium cirratum (rengarenga).en_NZ
dc.subjectchloroplast DNA sequencingen_NZ
dc.subjectMāori horticultureen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealand rock lilyen_NZ
dc.subjectRengarengaen_NZ
dc.titleEvidence of a strong domestication bottleneck in the recently cultivated New Zealand endemic root crop, Arthropodium cirratum (Asparagaceae)en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2017-12-12T13:30:21Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright: © 2016 Shepherd et al.en_NZ
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0152455en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden050202 Conservation and Biodiversityen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationShepherd, L.D., de Lange, P.J., Cox, S., McLenachan, P.A., Roskruge, N.R., & Lockhart, P.J. (2016). Evidence of a Strong Domestication Bottleneck in the Recently Cultivated New Zealand Endemic Root Crop, Arthropodium cirratum (Asparagaceae). PLOS one, 11, pp.1-16. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0152455en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage1en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage16en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume11en_NZ
unitec.publication.titlePLOS oneen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms60819en_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuAhu māraen_NZ
unitec.publication.placeSan Francisco, Californiaen_NZ


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in

Show simple record