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dc.contributor.authorLefort, Marie-Caroline
dc.contributor.authorBoyer, Stephane
dc.contributor.authorDe Romans, S.
dc.contributor.authorGlare, T.R.
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, K.
dc.contributor.authorWorner, S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-16T23:08:04Z
dc.date.available2018-01-16T23:08:04Z
dc.date.issued2014-02-25
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4041
dc.description.abstractOnly recently has it been formally acknowledged that native species can occasionally reach the status of `pest' or `invasive species' within their own native range. The study of such species has potential to help unravel fundamental aspects of biological invasions. A good model for such a study is the New Zealand native scarab beetle, Costelytra zealandica (White), which even in the presence of its natural enemies has become invasive in exotic pastures throughout the country. Because C. zealandica still occurs widely within its native habitat, we hypothesised that this species has only undergone a host range expansion (ability to use equally both an ancestral and new host) onto exotic hosts rather than a host shift (loss of fitness on the ancestral host in comparison to the new host). Moreover, this host range expansion could be one of the main drivers of its invasion success. In this study, we investigated the fitness response of populations of C. zealandica from native and exotic flora, to several feeding treatments comprising its main exotic host plant as well as one of its ancestral hosts. Our results suggest that our initial hypothesis was incorrect and that C. zealandica populations occurring in exotic pastures have experienced a host-shift rather than simply a host-range expansion. This finding suggests that an exotic plant introduction can facilitate the evolution of a distinct native host-race, a phenomenon often used as evidence for speciation in phytophagous insects and which may have been instrumental to the invasion success of C. zealandicaen_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://peerj.com/articles/262/en_NZ
dc.rightsDistributed under Creative-Commons CC-BY 3.0en_NZ
dc.subjectCostelytra zealandica (Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae)en_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjecthost-raceen_NZ
dc.subjectbio-typeen_NZ
dc.subjectnative invaderen_NZ
dc.subjectscaraben_NZ
dc.subjectexotic host planten_NZ
dc.titleInvasion success of a scarab beetle within its native range: host range expansion versus host-shiften_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2017-07-11T00:12:50Z
dc.rights.holderCopyright 2014 Lefort et alen_NZ
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.7717/peerj.262en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden050103 Invasive Species Ecologyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLefort, M.-C., Boyer, S., De Romans, S., ArmstrongGlare, T. R., Armstrong, K., & Worner, S. (2014). Invasion success of a scarab beetle within its native range: host range expansion versus host-shift. PeerJ, 2, pp.e262. doi:10.7717/peerj.262en_NZ
unitec.publication.spagee262en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume2en_NZ
unitec.publication.titlePeerJen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms58111en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms59184


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