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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-18T00:43:04Z
dc.date.available2017-07-18T00:43:04Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3859
dc.description.abstractIf the iconic kiwi species became extinct would the nation mourn its loss? Effects of climate change, increasing populations, and expanding urban landscapes has contributed to the degeneration of our diverse and fragile ecologies with which New Zealand’s identity is built on. With much of the remaining endangered fauna confined to offshore islands, the role that ecological conservation serves is becoming increasingly vital for the survival of these endemic species. Failure to do so and the title ‘kiwi’ New Zealanders call themselves could be named after an extinct species killed by humanity. This research project, ‘Sound of Silence’, addresses a limitation in current thinking about the environment within the human race. Using architecture as a mechanism to expand public ecological literacy, by providing an educated sensory experience that informs an emotional connection with wildlife, and therefore a desire to protect. The research undergone will explore the possibility of integrating a structure into the Motutapu Island landscape, which through both its architecture and programme, will play an active role in the restoration of the islands ecologies. Project site: Between Islington Bay on Rangitoto Island and Home Bay on Motutapu Island.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectRangitoto Island (Auckland, New Zealand)en_NZ
dc.subjectMotutapu Island (Auckland, New Zealand)en_NZ
dc.subjectbiophilic designen_NZ
dc.subjectconservation educationen_NZ
dc.subjectwildlife museumsen_NZ
dc.subjectnature centresen_NZ
dc.subjecteducation for sustainabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectecologyen_NZ
dc.titleSound of silence. How can an architectural proposition enhance and promote ecological conservation, while facilitating an educated interaction between wildlife and humans?en_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden050203 Environmental Education and Extensionen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSmith, H. (2017) Sound of silence. How can an architectural proposition enhance and promote ecological conservation, while facilitating an educated interaction between wildlife and humans? An unpublished research project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Masters of Architecture (Professional), Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.pages92en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuTe tini whanaunga o ngahereen_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuWhenua rāhuien_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuKaitiakitangaen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalHall, Min
unitec.advisor.associatedMcConchie, Graeme
unitec.institution.studyareaArchitecture


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