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dc.contributor.authorWest, Ashley
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-24T01:10:20Z
dc.date.available2017-02-24T01:10:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3634
dc.description.abstract‘Wellbeing’ is not the easiest subject to discuss. It is difficult to quantify, and even more difficult to offer a precise definition. We currently function in a society where our needs are justified and driven by financial motive. Anything outside of what the market tells us we need, or what is economically advantageous, is difficult to comprehend and even harder to fight for. It is engrained in our culture to measure success financially, and to support those working towards it. This focus on wealth stems from the belief that everything that we need or want can be bought – that ‘wellbeing’ is something that will either arrive naturally or by improving financial circumstances. I started this thesis with the belief that no one intends to live an unfulfilled life. We each strive towards success in the hope of reaching happiness and achieving ‘wellbeing’, yet we have failed to see the entirety of the repercussions of our actions. My research project will look critically at wellbeing, how we define it, how it is really achieved, and its relationship to architecture and planning. Even measured by conventional methodologies, wellbeing levels in New Zealand are low across all areas, regardless of housing typology, income, age or race. My design intervention will therefore be a proposal for a typical suburban neighbourhood in Auckland, where increasing densities are inevitably remoulding the quarter acre dream. This project will explore numerous constraints surrounding diverse existing building typologies, patterns of home ownership, the suburban mind-set and financial barriers, all of which are factors contributing toward the initial proposition: that standards of wellbeing in the present New Zealand context are poor for many, and that these standards are affected by our housing environments in the broadest sense. Site: Miro Street, Koromiko Street, Rimu Street, New Lynn, Auckland between Kelston Girls College and Lynn Mall.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectMiro Street (New Lynn, Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectKoromiko Street (New Lynn, Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectRimu Street (New Lynn, Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectNew Lynn (Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectwell beingen_NZ
dc.subjectcommunity developmenten_NZ
dc.subjectsustainable community developmenten_NZ
dc.subjecthousing in Aucklanden_NZ
dc.subjectsuburbsen_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland Unitary Planen_NZ
dc.titleFilling the blanks : a suburban opportunity for wellbeingen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120508 Urban Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationWest, A. (2016). Filling the blanks : a suburban opportunity for wellbeing. Master thesis explanatory document. An unpublished research project submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture Professional, Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.pages192en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalTurner, David
unitec.advisor.associatedBudgett, Jeanette


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