Show simple record

dc.contributor.authorSharifzadeh, Hamid
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Jacqui
dc.contributor.authorSarrafzadeh, Hossein
dc.contributor.authorArdekani, Iman
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-10T23:48:49Z
dc.date.available2016-08-10T23:48:49Z
dc.date.issued2016-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3534
dc.description.abstractThe human voice is the most magnificent instrument for communication, capable of expressing deep emotions, conveying oral history through generations, or of starting a war. However, those who suffer from aphonia (no voice) and dysphonia (voice disorders) are unable to make use of this critical form of communication. They are typically unable to project anything more than hoarse whispers. Epidemiologic studies of the prevalence of voice disorders in the general adult population are rare. Nevertheless, information from a number of studies suggests that one third of the population have suffered from a temporary vocal impairment at some point in their life and that voice disorders can affect any age group and either sex. In some cases, vocal change is temporary however in those treated for malignant disease or with severe trauma there may be long term disturbance of phonation. This may affect occupation, social function and quality of life. Within a speech processing framework, we have worked on a novel method to return natural voice to laryngectomised people. This method leverages on recent advances in speech synthesis to deliver aworld-first technology. As a pilot study, this project has assessed the acoustic features of laryngectomised speech and has developed required enhancement for natural speech regeneration.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherHealth Informatics New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectlaryngectomyen_NZ
dc.subjectvoice reconstructionen_NZ
dc.subjectartificial phonationen_NZ
dc.subjectspeech synthesisen_NZ
dc.titleBionic voice (pilot study) : natural speech restoration for voice impaired individualsen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.rights.holderHealth Informatics New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subject.marsden200402 Computational Linguisticsen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden100599 Communications Technologies not elsewhere classifieden_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSharifzadeh, H. R., Allen, J. E., Sarrafzadeh, A., & Ardekani, I. (2016, November). Bionic Voice (Pilot Study): Natural Speech Restoration for Voice Impaired Individuals. HiNZ (Ed.), Health Informatics New Zealand Conference (pp.238).en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.institutionAuckland Voice and Swallowen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage238en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage238en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleHiNZ 2016 conferenceen_NZ
unitec.conference.titleHealth Informatics New Zealand Conferenceen_NZ
unitec.conference.orgHealth Informatics New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.conference.orgAustralasian Telehealth Societyen_NZ
unitec.conference.orgUniversity of Queensland. Centre for Online Healthen_NZ
unitec.conference.orgNurse Executives of New Zealand Incen_NZ
unitec.conference.locationSKYCITY Convention Centre (Auckland, New Zealand)en_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2016-10-31
unitec.conference.edate2016-11-03
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms59219en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms60139


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in

Show simple record