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dc.contributor.authorCarbines, Maria
dc.contributor.authorLu, Hongyan
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Jillian
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-08T01:41:37Z
dc.date.available2016-04-08T01:41:37Z
dc.date.issued2015-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3317
dc.description.abstractAim To explore the perceptions of BN student nurses regarding the influence of preceptors on their clinical learning Research question What helps or hinders BN students’ learning from preceptors during clinical placements? The Nursing Council of New Zealand education standards stipulate that students completing a programme of study leading to registration as registered nurses (RNs) must complete between 1100-1500 clinical hours. This occurs in healthcare settings where students work alongside RNs. Known as preceptors, these RNs supervise, teach and sometjmes assess students. Within these preceptor-student interactions, the future of nursing is co-created as students begin to develop their own professional identities. Previous research has determined that the student-preceptor relationship is complex and challeng­ing on many levels for both parties. In New Zealand in particular, little is known about how students manage to successfully achieve their clinical competencies in environments that are not always conducive to their learning. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore student nurse perceptions of the influences of pre­ceptors during clinical placements. Twenty-three third year students from a New Zealand nursing school participated during their transition semesters prior to the Nursing Council State Final Ex­amination. Data gathered from focus groups and individual interviews were analysed using a general inductive approach (Thomas, 2006). The themes identified were 'the Learning Environment; 'The Student-Preceptor Relationship' and 'Managing the Challenges'. Knowledge generated by this study adds breadth and depth to what is already known about the student-preceptor relationship and has potential benefits for students, nursing schools and health­care facilities which provide clinical experience for students. It implies that knowing informs what may be done in order to nurture the very foundation of nursing's future - today's student nurses.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectnursing studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectBachelor of Nursing (Unitec)en_NZ
dc.subjectUnitec coursesen_NZ
dc.subjectuniversity to work transitionen_NZ
dc.subjectpreceptorsen_NZ
dc.subjectstudents' perceptionsen_NZ
dc.subjectclinical practiceen_NZ
dc.titleGoing with it to get it done : student nurse perceptions of the influences of preceptors on their learning in clinical practiceen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Oral Presentationen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAuthoren_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130209 Medicine, Nursing and Health Curriculum and Pedagogyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCarbines, M., Lu, H. & Phillips, J. (2015, November). Going with it to get it done: Student nurse perceptions of the influences of preceptors on their learning in clinical practice. Paper presented at Australasian Nurses Educators Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage1en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage33en_NZ
unitec.conference.titleAustralasian Nurse Educators Conference (ANEC)en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgAustralasian Nurse Educatorsen_NZ
unitec.conference.locationAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2015-11
unitec.conference.edate2015-11
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms58427en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms58429


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