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dc.contributor.authorKostiuk-Warren, J. Max
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-14T19:51:17Z
dc.date.available2016-03-14T19:51:17Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3254
dc.description.abstractThis project asks the question: ‘How can the home be redefined, in the New Zealand context, to integrate a high level of adaptability into the design scheme once the initial construction of the home has been completed?’ This question was chosen as a result of looking specifically at first home buyers and how a scheme like this could potentially benefit them. What if a homeowner could build small to save money initially, then easily be able to expand when needed later? The theoretical review looks into the history of prefabrication and includes a review of different types of prefabrication methods (component, panel, module, hybrid, and complete buildings). It also looks into the benefits and drawbacks of prefabrication in the building industry today. By examining historic precedents such as the Hivehaus, Boxus, ZipUp Enclosures, and the Nakagin Capsule Tower, it was possible to gain a greater understanding of what has been designed in the past and why it may not have been as successful as possible. Three main prototypes were explored through a highly detailed level of digital modelling. Digital modelling was chosen as it is the only medium to provide the level of detail required in order to really test how the building and all of its components would work in unison, to explore the full extent of the adaptability. The conclusion of this research project is a building that operates as an adaptable form to accommodate changes that reflect the changing needs of the occupants. This project will not look into creating and developing entirely new methods of construction in the New Zealand building industry. It will instead look at ways to utilise, expand on, and adapt methods of prefabrication which have already been developed (and proven to work in the New Zealand context) in a new way that will allow a high level of flexibility in the design/layout once the building has been constructed and is being occupied.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectresidential accommodationen_NZ
dc.subjectprefabricationen_NZ
dc.subjectadaptive designen_NZ
dc.subjectmodular architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectdomestic architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectdo-it-yourself (DIY)en_NZ
dc.titleA home today, designed for tomorrow : a home which can be added onto, subtracted from, and adapted as our lives change over timeen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationKostiuk-Warren, J. M. (2015). A home today, designed for tomorrow : a home which can be added onto, subtracted from, and adapted as our lives change over time. Explanatory Document. An unpublished research project submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional). Unitec Institute of Technology.en_NZ
unitec.pages185en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalSchnoor, Christoph
unitec.advisor.associatedTurner, David
unitec.advisor.associatedBudgett, Jeanette


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