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dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Shamus J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-13T22:07:01Z
dc.date.available2016-03-13T22:07:01Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3248
dc.description.abstractAuckland is a unique city defined by its impressive geological condition and rich cultural heritage, unfortunately the city’s architecture poorly reflects this special quality. As a young and prosperous city, Auckland has the potential to become a significant figure in architectural innovation and urban design by developing ways to better cater to the needs of the people. As the city continues to develop and improve, architects need to begin developing spaces which allow the public to come together and celebrate their unique city. The aim of this thesis is to develop a public building that symbolises Auckland City’s unique context and helps to improve public life. An examination of how public architecture can engage entire societies and connect them to their surroundings will play a crucial role in the development of a thorough design proposal. Theoretical research and vigorous design interrogation will lead to an innovative proposal which provides the opportunity for the Auckland public to express themselves. The site plays a critical role in this thesis as a predetermined condition to which the architectural theories explored, will be applied. Queens Wharf was a key player in Auckland’s development and provides a perfect platform for the creation of a public hub, integrated into the existing urban fabric. Lying at the bottom of the city’s most important axis and the current maritime gateway, Queens Wharf is the point where the land and water that define the city, become one. The site contains the necessary existing conditions to facilitate meaningful and detailed design outcomes which address Auckland’s physical, social, ecological, cultural and economic context. “The People’s Wharf,” as city officials have dubbed it, represents one of the most significant public space in the downtown area and offers a chance to link the existing city infrastructure to a developing pedestrianised waterfront. Auckland’s current urban fabric is a poor representation of its unique setting and in need of a progressive architectural statement. A design that internationally exhibits Auckland’s community is needed now more than ever, “the soul of a city for all to see.”en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectshipyard designen_NZ
dc.subjectwaterfront architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectindustrial portsen_NZ
dc.subjectQueens Wharf (Quay Street, Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectpedestrian traffic flowsen_NZ
dc.subjectcruise ship terminalsen_NZ
dc.titleThe people's wharf : how can architecture be used to transform Queens Wharf into a public space that engages the community, integrates existing infrastructure and improves public life?en_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120507 Urban Analysis and Developmenten_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCowe, S.J. (2015). The people's wharf : how can architecture be used to transform Queens Wharf into a public space that engages the community, integrates existing infrastructure and improves public life? [Unpublished thesis] submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Masters of Architecture [Professional], Unitec, School of Architectureen_NZ
unitec.pages122en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalChaplin, David
unitec.advisor.associatedBogunovich, Dushko
unitec.advisor.associatedBudgett, Jeanette


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