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dc.contributor.authorTolich, Martin
dc.contributor.authorBathurst, Ralph
dc.contributor.authorDeckert, Antje
dc.contributor.authorFlanagan, Paul
dc.contributor.authorGremillion, Helen
dc.contributor.authorGrimshaw, Grimshaw
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-07T00:00:52Z
dc.date.available2016-03-07T00:00:52Z
dc.date.issued2015-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3220
dc.description.abstractSince 1988 in NZ all university and funded health researchers have been mandated to seek ethical review for research projects At the time, the Ministry of Health ethics committees were guided by an operational standard for health research, yet no equivalent national ethics statement has been produced to guide all University research in NZ (unlike the situation in Canada and Australia) Academics are justifiably questioning of institutional efforts to temper their autonomy unnecessarily, but little is known – outside of local/individual experiences – about how ethics committees actually work This current project seeks to identify strengths of alternative approaches in particular institutional circumstances. It maintains a critical edge centred on improving appropriate access to committee processes and deliberations, and on improving the potential ‘educative’ (vs. governance) focus of ethics committees. Some key findings: No two committees share even broadly similar organizational structures. Four of the five committees are centralised, but the ways in which they operate differ significantly Researchers have a variable range of access to advice and consultation, and they tend not to use the optional provisions that exist All five committees are involved in facilitating (varying) learning opportunities within committees and/or in exchanges with othersen_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectresearch ethics committeesen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjecttertiary institutionsen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealand. Committee of Inquiry into Allegations concerning the Treatment of Cervical Cancer at National Women's Hospital and into other related matters.en_NZ
dc.subjectCartwright Inquiryen_NZ
dc.titleOne size does not fit all : organizational diversity in New Zealand tertiary sector ethics committeesen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Oral Presentationen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAuthorsen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden220107 Professional Ethics (incl. police and research ethics)en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130304 Educational Administration, Management and Leadershipen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTolich, M., Bathurst, R., Deckert, A., Flanagan, P., Gremillion, H., & Grimshaw, M. (2015, May). One size does not fit all: Organizational diversity in New Zealand tertiary sector ethics committees. Paper presented at Ethics in Practice Conference, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.institutionMassey Universityen_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.institutionUniversity of Canterburyen_NZ
unitec.institutionWaikato Universityen_NZ
unitec.institutionAuckland University of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.conference.titleEthics in Practice Conferenceen_NZ
unitec.conference.locationUniversity of Otago, Dunedinen_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2015-05
unitec.conference.edate2015-05
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms57910en_NZ


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