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dc.contributor.authorWoods, Toni
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-27T21:19:28Z
dc.date.available2015-06-27T21:19:28Z
dc.date.issued2013en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2883
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the perception of students in regard to the campus climate as it affected Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Questioning (LGBTIQ) students at Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec), in New Zealand in 2012 and whether this perception differed between heterosexual and LGBTIQ students. An online questionnaire incorporating both quantitative and qualitative type questions was developed utilising Sue Rankin’s (2003) national campus climate assessment questionnaire. The questionnaire was modified to reflect the New Zealand context and the Unitec campus. The population was drawn from the entire student body and consisted of those students who were enrolled to study at Unitec in August 2012 and had a current student email account (11,446 students). A link to the questionnaire was emailed to these 11,446 students. Three hundred and fifty-five students completed the questionnaire; 195 identified as heterosexual and 145 identified as LGBTIQ. While the findings of the study indicate that, overall, most students, both heterosexual and LGBTIQ, spoke positively regarding their experiences of studying at Unitec. The research did uncover some differences between the campus climate perceptions of LGBTIQ students and those of heterosexual students. Analysis revealed that LGBTIQ students experienced a level of invisibility and had a strong desire for a sense of community with other LGBTIQ students. They also revealed a reluctance to be “fully out”, both professionally and personally, on the Unitec campus. The theme of non-disclosure appeared to be related to perceptions of fear regarding sexual orientation. The data from this research suggests that, while the students who identified as heterosexual felt LGBTIQ identity was a non-issue, and were largely uncertain if LGBTIQ students were harassed on the Unitec campus, both heterosexual and LGBTIQ students identified uncertainty regarding institutional responses, policies, resources and curriculum for LGBTIQ students on campus The results of this survey may be utilised to impact on the focus and delivery of student services for LGBTIQ Unitec students, staff training and diversity initiatives at Unitec. Future opportunities exist to utilise this study as a baseline Unitec campus climate assessment for LGBTIQ studentsen_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectUnitec studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectLGBTIQen_NZ
dc.subjectlesbianen_NZ
dc.subjectgayen_NZ
dc.subjectbisexualen_NZ
dc.subjecttransgenderen_NZ
dc.subjectintersexen_NZ
dc.subjectquestioningen_NZ
dc.subjectcampus climateen_NZ
dc.subjectperceptionsen_NZ
dc.subjecthomophobiaen_NZ
dc.subjectcoming out (sexual orientation)en_NZ
dc.title‘Flying under the Radar’ : the experiences and perceptions of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Questioning students and how they differed from heterosexual experiences and perceptions of the campus climate at Unitec Campus in New Zealand in 2012en_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Health Scienceen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130308 Gender, Sexuality and Educationen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationWoods, T. (2013). ‘Flying under the Radar’ : the experiences and perceptions of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Questioning students and how they differed from heterosexual experiences and perceptions of the campus climate at Unitec Campus in New Zealand in 2012. An unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfilment for the degree of Master of Health Sciences, Unitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.pages114en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalRoy, Dianne
unitec.advisor.associatedTrewartha, Rae


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