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dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Chris
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-09T01:51:05Z
dc.date.available2015-04-09T01:51:05Z
dc.date.issued2013-11
dc.identifier.issn9780992383503
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2715
dc.description.abstractFrom the 12th March 2012, all builders in New Zealand doing certain restricted building work will require to be licensed. The passing of the Building Amendment Bill No 3 in March 2012 enshrines this requirement into the Building Act. The licensing of building practitioners marks a significant retreat from the strong pioneering tradition of self-help building that historically has been a significant element in small-scale construction within New Zealand. This paper will provide a brief history of the controversy surrounding building under performance. It will examine the role proposed for the Licensed Building Practitioner and the role LBP’s will play within the building industry. Submissions on the merits of the scheme, made in response to a request for feedback from the Building Act Review signaled in 2009 and the Building Amendment Bill No 3 (in 2011), are examined, evaluated and compared to an industry survey completed six months after the scheme’s introduction in March of 2012. The paper supports the view that the transfer of responsibility, of which the LBP is a part, runs the risk of failure unless legislative and educational systems supporting the intended role have had time to coalesce and prove their effectiveness.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherArchitectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Australiaen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://anzasca.net/en_NZ
dc.rights© 2013, The Architectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Australiaen_NZ
dc.subjectLeaking buildingsen_NZ
dc.subjectBuilding Code Policy: Construction Technology: Licensed Building Practitioneren_NZ
dc.subjectBuilding Amendment Bill No 3 (2012)en_NZ
dc.subjectBuilding Acten_NZ
dc.subjectlicensingen_NZ
dc.titleThe consumer fightback: New refurbishment policies for NZ residential buildings.en_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.rights.holderArchitectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Australiaen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden12 Built Environment and Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden180105 Commercial and Contract Lawen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMurphy, C.P. (2013). The consumer fightback: New refurbishment policies for NZ residential buildings. In M.A. Schnabel & J-YT Sou (Eds.)(Ed.), Cutting Edge in Architectural Science. Proceedings of the 47th International Conference of the Architectural Science Associationen_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage589en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage598en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleCutting Edge in Architectural Science. Proceedings of the 47th International Conference of the Architectural Science Associationen_NZ
unitec.conference.titleCutting Edge in Architectural Science. Proceedings of the 47th International Conference of the Architectural Science Association.en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgArchitectural Science Association (ANZAScA), Australiaen_NZ
unitec.conference.locationThe School of Architecture, The Chinese University of Hong Kongen_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2013-11-13
unitec.conference.edate2013-11-16
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms55534en_NZ


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