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dc.contributor.authorNiaNia, Wiremu
dc.contributor.authorBush, Allister
dc.contributor.authorEpston, David
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-18T23:06:10Z
dc.date.available2015-03-18T23:06:10Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-16
dc.identifier.issn0814-723X
dc.identifier.issn1467-8438
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2664
dc.description.abstractTraditional healers in many parts of the world have used family focused understandings and interventions well before the emergence of western family therapy theory and practice. This paper gives a detailed account of New Zealand. Māori traditional healing work with a Cook Island Māori family in which the eldest daughter was in considerable distress as were her family, who believed that she had become maki tūpāpaku (possessed). This account is told from the perspectives of the child psychiatrist, the traditional healer and the mother of the family. While the intervention bears a superficial resemblance to western family therapy approaches, the theoretical foundation reflects the traditional healer’s New Zealand Māori world views in which spiritual understandings are paramount, and concepts of mana, tapu and mauri guide him in the family healing process. The single session described here can be viewed as an indigenous family therapy intervention involving six generations of family members, both living and deceased, in the one room. Conclusions: Indigenous communities have called for traditional healers to be employed alongside child mental health workers and family therapists who work with their communities. Close and sincere collaboration between an indigenous traditional healer and a health professional can offer a family in distress healing possibilities that may not be available to them in conventional child mental health or other family therapy settings.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/anzf.1002/abstracten_NZ
dc.rights© 2013 Australian Association of Family Therapyen_NZ
dc.subjectCook Island Māorien_NZ
dc.subjectfamily therapyen_NZ
dc.subjectindigenousen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealand Māorien_NZ
dc.subjecttraditional healingen_NZ
dc.title'I will not leave my baby behind': A Cook Island Maori family's experience of New Zealand Maori traditional healingen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_NZ
dc.identifier.doidoi: 10.1002/anzf.1002en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden111713 Māori Healthen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Servicesen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNiaNia, W., Tere, Bush, A., and Epston, D. (2013). 'I will not leave my baby behind': A Cook Island Maori family's experience of New Zealand Maori traditional healing. Austalian and New Zealand journal of family therapy, 34, 3-17.en_NZ
unitec.institutionTātaihono Consultants, Tinirotoen_NZ
unitec.institutionCapital Coast District Health Board, Poriruaen_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage3en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage17en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume34en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleAustalian and New Zealand journal of family therapyen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms55035en_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuHauorami_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuTohunga kēhuami_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuWhanaungatangami_NZ


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