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dc.contributor.authorMillar, Sheena
dc.date.accessioned2015-02-19T20:38:36Z
dc.date.available2015-02-19T20:38:36Z
dc.date.issued2014en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2569
dc.description.abstractThis study set out to examine the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students within secondary education in Aotearoa-New Zealand. A qualitative methodology was employed for this research, which focused on two mainstream secondary schools. At each school, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the educational leader in charge of the academic mentoring programme, and focus group discussions were undertaken with staff, whanau and Maori Year 12 and 13 students. This study sought to approach the research from a strengths-based perspective, meaning that the schools selected were consistently producing results for Maori students above the national average in their decile range. The data collected were used to identify themes and commonalities across the schools in a cross-school analysis. The findings indicate a variety of approaches to how academic mentoring can be offered in secondary schools. However, there are commonalities which impact on the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students in mainstream secondary settings in Aotearoa-New Zealand. The literature and the data show that academic mentoring is an approach which could assist Maori student achievement if certain conditions exist. These conditions are: supporting Maori student academic decision making with data; including whanau in the implementation and running of the programme; addressing any sustainability issues associated with the programme; and being aware of the cultural pedagogy staff require to educate the whole child. Conversely, a challenge identified is that the experience of academic mentoring for Maori students is dependent on the academic mentor. This means not all teachers are equipped with equal skills when it comes to academic mentoring. These findings suggest that school leaders need to consider carefully how they will introduce, implement and run such programmes. The academic mentoring programme cannot be an ‘add-on’; it must be integrated into a school-wide approach which supports culturally responsive pedagogy based on timely, easy-to-access academic data. The recommendations arising from this study have implications for schools that include: schools having good student data management systems; schools allocating adequate time to the academic mentoring programme; schools working with staff to make sure they are using culturally-responsive pedagogy; having support available to professionally develop academic mentors; ensuring the mentee groups are of a manageable size; and involving staff, whanau and Maori students in the setting up and development of the academic mentoring programme.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectMāori studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectsecondary schoolsen_NZ
dc.subjectacademic mentoringen_NZ
dc.subjectmentoring in educationen_NZ
dc.titleInvestigating the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students within secondary education in Aotearoa-New Zealanden_NZ
dc.title.alternativeResearch question 1: Why have educational leaders in two secondary schools provided academic mentoring for Maori students?en_NZ
dc.title.alternativeResearch question 2: How have two secondary schools implemented academic mentoring with Maori students?en_NZ
dc.title.alternativeResearch question 3: What perceived benefits and difficulties have accrued for Maori students as a result of their engagement in academic mentoring?en_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Educational Leadership and Managementen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130310 Māori Education (excl. Early Childhood and Primary Education)en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMillar, S. (2014) Investigating the perceived benefits and difficulties associated with academic mentoring for Maori students within secondary education in Aotearoa-New Zealand. An unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Educational Leadership and Management, Unitec Institute of Technology.en_NZ
unitec.pages118en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuKura tuaruami_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuKaiakomi_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuPuritanga ākongaen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalSmith, Alison


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