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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Scott
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Hester
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-26T02:25:05Z
dc.date.available2013-08-26T02:25:05Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2298
dc.description.abstractThe form of Western mainstream film is the crux of its ideological effi-ciency: by using established formal techniques, films ensure audiences understand that aesthetic decisions support and clarify the narrative to ensure maximum spectatorial satisfaction. However, some films exploit their formal aesthetics in order to prevent clarification, thwarting satisfaction in favour of viewing practices that can be considered perverse in that they withhold, suspend or obstruct immediate pleasure ...en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.relation.uriwww.colloquy.monash.edu.au/issue18/joyce-wilson.pdfen_NZ
dc.title“Bad Form”: Contemporary Cinema’s Turn to the Perverseen_NZ
dc.title.alternativeDavid Lynch: Lost Highway (1997) Lars von Trier: Breaking the Waves (1996)en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holder© Monash Universityen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden190201 Cinema Studiesen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationWilson, S., and Joyce, H. (2009). Bad Form: Contemporary Cinema's Turn to the Perverse. Colloquy: Text, Theory, Critique. December 18 : 132-142.en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.titleColloquy: Text, Theory, Critiqueen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms49699
unitec.institution.studyareaDesign and Visual Arts


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