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dc.contributor.authorChan, Angel
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-12T03:58:23Z
dc.date.available2013-07-12T03:58:23Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2251
dc.description.abstractNew Zealand early childhood centers are increasingly multicultural. New migrant families bring diverse language and cultural practice to our centers. Families and teachers may not share the same child rearing and educational beliefs. This article focuses on Chinese families in particular, and discusses ways in which early childhood professionals can acknowledge and understand cultural differences. Some behaviors of Chinese migrant children and parents, that are commonly misinterpreted by teachers, can be explored through a variety if theoretical and philosophical perspectives ...en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectmigrant familiesen_NZ
dc.subjectmulticulturalen_NZ
dc.subjectlanguageen_NZ
dc.subjectcultural practiceen_NZ
dc.subjectearly childhooden_NZ
dc.subjectChinese in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectChinese childrenen_NZ
dc.subjectChinese migrantsen_NZ
dc.subjectChinese parentsen_NZ
dc.titleThe teachers said my child is differenten_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAuthoren_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130102 Early Childhood Education (excl. Māori)en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationChan, A. (2006). The teachers said my child is different. The First Years: Ngā Tau Tuatahi. New Zealand Journal of Infant and Toddler Education. 8(1) : 34-38.en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.titleThe First Years: Ngā Tau Tuatahi. New Zealand Journal of Infant and Toddler Educationen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ


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