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dc.contributor.authorYang, Chen-yu
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-07T21:45:31Z
dc.date.available2013-03-07T21:45:31Z
dc.date.issued2012en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2080
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTIONS: 1. What are the key factors in developing a successful adaptive reuse project? 2. What are the appropriate architectural solutions for the redevelopment of a heritage site and its surrounding community? 3. How might cultural activities successfully activate an existing architectural space and its surrounding communities? 4. How can adaptive reuse successfully represent and advertise Auckland’s creative arts community? 5. To what extent do local authority strategies and regulations relating to the creative industries lead to desirable outcomes? Currently, the city of Auckland is focused on its function of commerce and Sky Tower has become recognized as Auckland’s identity since it was built. SkyCity was built as a major tourist facility in Auckland, but we must call into question how special and different SkyCity is. What else can Aucklanders provide for their visitors? Besides commercial activities the creative part of Auckland seems to be neglected. Thus, this research project began with the questions of: What actually makes a city interesting? Is there anything more we can provide that would benefit our visitors? When people are in a foreign country, are they more interested in places like traditional markets or concrete towers? Perhaps a place that reflects local culture and life style is more interesting than high tech buildings? To visit a local market certainly provides people the most natural and direct way to be involved in the local culture. There is no question that a pleasant environment is important, but people and culture are the essential components that make a city an interesting place to visit. Besides commercial activities, Auckland is also a great city for creative people. The city has the highest creative sector employments of all New Zealand cities. The creative part of Auckland is full of potential and it is the key that could lift the city to the next level. However, the existing creative community needs to be highlighted, restructured and carefully represented to a higher degree in order to enhance Auckland’s identity and make it a more attractive city. This research design project proposed an active showcase for Auckland’s creative industries. The investigation examines the relationship between the selected historical site (Victoria Park Market), adaptive reuse strategies and the existing creative industries. The outcome of the study is to establish appropriate design solutions for the proposed programme, the selected site and its surrounding community, while old Auckland is preserved and the existing Auckland identity is enhanced.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectVictoria Park Market and adjacent Carpark Buildingen_NZ
dc.subjectFreeman's Bay Aucklanden_NZ
dc.subjectadaptive reuseen_NZ
dc.subjectheritage sitesen_NZ
dc.subjectbuilding adaptive reuseen_NZ
dc.subjectcreativity centres
dc.titleHUB-210 : from destructor to generatoren_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120102 Architectural Heritage and Conservationen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationYang, C.Y. (2012). HUB-210: From destructor to generator. A research project submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional). Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand.
unitec.pages139en_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalSu, Bin
unitec.advisor.associatedMcConchie, Graeme


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