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dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Tanya
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-19T22:09:15Z
dc.date.available2011-09-19T22:09:15Z
dc.date.issued2008-08-01
dc.identifier.issn0022-0620
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/1679
dc.description.abstractFor the past two decades schools and teachers in New Zealand and elsewhere have been the subject of and subjected to intense public scrutiny of their performance and professional activities. In effect, policy solutions have cast teacher and school performance as a ‘problem’ to be solved/resolved via the intervention of the State. Consequently, the policy remedy has been the introduction of audit mechanisms such as systems of performance management to define, regulate and control teaching and teachers. That is, the State has directly intervened in the professional work and activities of teachers based on the flawed assumption that teachers cannot be trusted and therefore require the intervention of the State and its agencies to ensure their performance is aligned with organisational objectives. And while one of the hallmarks of a profession and professional practice is adherence to a set of prescribed standards, performance management has rendered teachers accountable to the State, not professional peers. And, as this article outlines, this has served to de-professionalise teaching and teachers’ work.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherRoutledgeen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0022-0620&volume=40&issue=2&spage=113en_NZ
dc.rightsThis is an electronic version of an article published in the Journal of Educational Administration and History, 40(2), 113-128. doi: 10.1080/00220620802210871. The Journal of Educational Administration and History is available online at http://www.tandfonline.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0022-0620&volume=40&issue=2&spage=113en_NZ
dc.subjectperformance managementen_NZ
dc.subjectaudit cultureen_NZ
dc.subjectteacher’s worken_NZ
dc.subjectde-professionalisationen_NZ
dc.titleThe continuing politics of mistrust: Performance management and the erosion of professional worken_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderTaylor & Francis Groupen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00220620802210871en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130304 Educational Administration, Management and Leadershipen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationFitzgerald, T. (2008). The continuing politics of mistrust: Performance management and the erosion of professional work. Journal of Educational Administration and History, 40(2), 113-128. doi: 10.1080/00220620802210871en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage113en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage128en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume40en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleJournal of Educational Administration and Historyen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ


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