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dc.contributor.authorWare, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-19T00:12:56Z
dc.date.available2011-04-19T00:12:56Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/1515
dc.description.abstractA paradigm shift in embassy architecture has been initiated by The Swedish National Property Board, culminating in the ‘House of Sweden’, Washington D.C. This project attempts to extend that initiative for the design of a House of Sweden in Wellington, New Zealand; it has relationships and integration with the host country. The process of design explorations investigated how research by design was employed to formulate a conclusion. The stance taken renounces the notion of representational architecture that is prominent in embassy typology and concentrated solely on good architectural principles. Security is a highly influential factor in embassy architecture. The design was no more or no less secure than that of the Washington ‘House of Sweden’, but has addressed the security issues while not allowing the embassy to become an isolated entity within the building. The overall development of the project has been determined by the urban context in which it is sited. The project provides the traditional embassy and consulate activities. However, the unusual inclusion of a shared double staircase component in the building, links Wellington waterfront to the suburban area beyond. It allows the public an ability to engage, interact, dwell and enjoy the volume of the new House of Sweden. It thus creates a ‘true’ transparency that is more than just the proverbial glass box architecture.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectEmbassy architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectUrban contexten_NZ
dc.subjectDesign for securityen_NZ
dc.titleA ‘House of Sweden’ in Wellington, New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationWare, M. (2010). A ‘House of Sweden’ in Wellington, New Zealand. (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/1515en
unitec.pages78en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalMitrovic, Branko
unitec.advisor.associatedChaplin, David


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