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dc.contributor.authorGilden, Anthonyen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-04T21:22:45Z
dc.date.available2010-03-04T21:22:45Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/1254
dc.description.abstractWestern project managers can increasingly be seen managing projects in Asia, so it is timely to assess whether the knowledge already acquired about cultural differences has permeated the discipline of project management. Do Western project managers ensure culture is a considered factor during the management of projects within the Asian region? Do Western project managers make any modifications to their project management techniques to account for cultural diversity? The purpose of this research is to examine any knowledge gaps concerning the perceptions of international project managers in regards to cultural differences between them and their project teams, and to see how, if at all, they dealt with these differences. This research focused specifically on Western project managers operating within the Asian region. This research involved a single case organisation study where both qualitative and quantitative data was gathered for analysis and interpretation. The study identified perceived Asian cultural challenges facing the Western project manager, and the modifications put in place to address them. As such it provides valuable information for both project managers already working in Asia, and prospective managers looking to operate in the Asian region. Western project managers going to work in Asia need to understand that there are many cultural influences, perhaps more than they realize, and that those cultural influences interact in ways that may not be readily apparent. The results of this study suggest the pure processes of project management can transcend culture, provided an awareness of potential cultural differences is present. The project management process does not need to be modified to account for cultural difference; rather Western project managers need to place more emphasis on particular stages of the process once they identify the cultural challenges they have to address. Further, they may need to modify their own personal management styles and enhance their ‘soft skills’, as these will be tested when they are required in a foreign environment.en_NZ
dc.formatapplication/pdfen_NZ
dc.language.isoen_NZen_NZ
dc.subjectcultureen_NZ
dc.subjectAsiaen_NZ
dc.subjectproject managementen_NZ
dc.titleHow are perceived cultural challenges addressed by the Western project manager operating in the Asian region?en_NZ
dc.typeMasters Dissertationen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAnthony Gildenen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Project Managementen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool of Businessen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsdenCommerce, Management, Tourism and Services (350000)en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationGilden, A. (2005). How are perceived cultural challenges addressed by the Western project manager operating in the Asian region?. Unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of Master of Project Management, Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.pages214en_NZ
unitec.supervisorNoel Burchell|Unitec New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.supervisorPeter Quinnell|Unitec New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalBurchell, Noel
unitec.advisor.associatedQuinnell, Peter


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