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dc.contributor.authorFarnworth, Mark
dc.contributor.authorAguilar, Glenn
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-19T21:58:22Z
dc.date.available2012-03-19T21:58:22Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1873-7730
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10652/1804
dc.description.abstractStray cats are a common feature of urban landscapes and are associated with issues of animal welfare and negative environmental impacts. Management, planning and decision-making require readily accessible information on stray cats. However, much of the existing data is not immediately useful for a geographic information system (GIS) in terms of format, content and explicit location information. Spreadsheets we obtained from a single large shelter in the Auckland region. They contained records of stray cat pickups and admissions for an entire year (n = 8573) of which 56.4% (n = 4834) contained data that could be processed to derive relevant spatial information. The resulting data consisted of identified roads and areas of Auckland where the stray cats were found. Published census databases and shapefiles were matched with the data to build a GIS of stray cats. Global and local regression analysis was employed to discover spatial distribution characteristics including the identification of areas with relatively high and low concentrations of stray cats and to explore relationships between socioeconomic condition and stray cat density. Significant clustering is more evident in South Auckland than elsewhere in the region. Specific geographical information is valuable, not only for understanding population dynamics of stray cats, but also to allow spatial and temporal targeting of resources to minimise their impact and promote responsible ownership.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherElsevieren_NZ
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Applied Geography. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Nurse Education Today, doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2011.11.011en_NZ
dc.subjectstray catsen_NZ
dc.subjectgeocodingen_NZ
dc.subjectspatial distributionen_NZ
dc.subjecthot spot analysisen_NZ
dc.subjectexploratory GISen_NZ
dc.subjectGWRen_NZ
dc.titleStray cats in Auckland, New Zealand: Discovering geographic information for exploratory spatial analysisen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderElsevieren_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apgeog.2011.11.011en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden090903 Geospatial Information Systemsen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAguilar, G., & Farnworth, M. (2012). Stray cats in Auckland, New Zealand: Discovering geographic information for exploratory spatial analysis. Applied Geography, 34, 230-238. doi:10.1016/j.apgeog.2011.11.011en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage230en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage238en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume34en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleApplied Geographyen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ


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