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The Flinders Program(TM) of chronic condition self-Management in New Zealand: Survey findings

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dc.contributor.author Horsburgh, Margaret
dc.contributor.author Bycroft, Janine
dc.contributor.author Goodyear-Smith, Felicity
dc.contributor.author Roy, Dianne
dc.contributor.author Mahony, Faith
dc.contributor.author Donnell, Erin
dc.contributor.author Miller, Denise
dc.date.accessioned 2011-12-05T20:34:59Z
dc.date.available 2011-12-05T20:34:59Z
dc.date.issued 2010-12
dc.identifier.issn 1172-6164
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10652/1740
dc.description.abstract Introduction: The Flinders Program(TM) of Chronic Condition Self-Management in New Zealand (NZ) has been given focus as a useful and appropriate approach for self-management support and improvement of long-term condition management. Aim: To determine the use of the Flinders Program(TM) in NZ and identify barriers and enablers to its use. Method: A web-based survey was undertaken in June 2009 with 355 eligible participants of the 500 who had completed ‘Flinders’ training in NZ since 2005. Results: 152 (43%) respondents completed the survey over a one-month time frame. Of those who responded, the majority were primary care nurses (80%; 118). Fifty-five percent (82) of survey respondents reported using some or all of the Flinders tools. Of these, 11% (16) reported using all of the tools or processes with 77% (104) of respondents having completed six or fewer client assessments utilising the Flinders tools. This indicates that respondents were relatively inexperienced with use of the Flinders Program(TM). Barriers to implementation were identified as the time needed for structured appointments (up to one hour), funding, resistance from colleagues, lack of space and insufficient ongoing support. Discussion: Despite the extent of training in the use of the Flinders Program(TM), there is limited use in clinical practice of the tools and processes associated with the model. Without structured support for quality improvement initiatives and self-management programmes, the ability to implement learned skills and complex interventions is limited. en_NZ
dc.language.iso en en_NZ
dc.publisher Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners en_NZ
dc.relation.uri https://www.rnzcgp.org.nz/assets/documents/Publications/JPHC/December-2010/JPHCOSPHorsburgh1Dec2010.pdf en_NZ
dc.subject Self-management en_NZ
dc.subject Long-term conditions en_NZ
dc.subject Chronic conditions en_NZ
dc.subject Chronic illness en_NZ
dc.subject Primary care en_NZ
dc.subject Nurses en_NZ
dc.title The Flinders Program(TM) of chronic condition self-Management in New Zealand: Survey findings en_NZ
dc.type Journal Article en_NZ
dc.rights.holder Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden 111002 Clinical Nursing: Primary (Preventative) en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitation Horsburgh, M., Bycroft, J., Goodyear-Smith, F., Roy, D., Mahony, F., Donnell, E., & Miller, D. (2010). Journal of Primary Health Care, 2(4), 288-293. Retrieved from http://www.rnzcgp.org.nz en_NZ
unitec.institution Unitec Institute of Technology en_NZ
unitec.institution University of Auckland en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage 288 en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage 293 en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume 2 en_NZ
unitec.publication.title Journal of Primary Health Care en_NZ
unitec.peerreviewed yes en_NZ


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