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Raising the bar on self-access centre learning support

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dc.contributor.author Dofs, Kerstin
dc.contributor.author Hobbs, Moira
dc.date.accessioned 2011-07-21T04:44:37Z
dc.date.available 2011-07-21T04:44:37Z
dc.date.issued 2010-01-01
dc.identifier.issn 9780958288934
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10652/1619
dc.description.abstract Tertiary Learning Advisors reflect on their ‘good practice’ through three key terms: utilisation, effectiveness and individual student support. We ask ourselves: Are the facilities and the advisory service support structures utilised fully? How effective is our learners’ study? What is best practice regarding the way we support our students? This article has two main sections. The first consists of a summary of individualised student support followed by two examples of practice in this area; these include an outline of three studies focusing on support for independent language learning conducted at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) from 2006 to 2009 (Dofs & Hornby, 2006; Dofs, 2009a; Dofs, 2009b), and an up-to-date description of independent language learning in the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) at Unitec. The second section comprises a progress report from a study about the current state of ILCs in New Zealand, the issues facing them, and how these might be addressed. The main themes emerging from both the research in progress, and from the authors’ own experiences, fall into two main categories: the philosophical position of independent learning/autonomous learning in the ILC within the institute, and the implications of managing a centre to be of most benefit to students. The latter were evident in the utilisation of the ILC at one of the institutions where research led to the conclusions that it is not enough to simply provide an ILC; students also have to learn how to study independently, how to use self study materials, and how to plan for their self studies, and the ILC should provide this support, in liaison with classroom teachers. en_NZ
dc.language.iso en en_NZ
dc.publisher ATLAANZ en_NZ
dc.relation.uri http://www.atlaanz.org/research-and-publications/albany-2009-conference-proceedings-published-2010 en_NZ
dc.subject Independent language learning en_NZ
dc.subject Individualised student support en_NZ
dc.subject Independent learning centres en_NZ
dc.title Raising the bar on self-access centre learning support en_NZ
dc.type Conference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedings en_NZ
dc.rights.holder ATLAANZ en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden 130103 Higher Education en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitation Dofs, K., & Hobbs, M. (2010). Raising the bar on self-access centre learning support. In V. van der Ham, L. Sevillano & L. George (Eds.). Shifting sands, firm foundations: Proceedings of the 2009 Annual International Conference of the Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (ATLAANZ). Auckland: ATLAANZ. Retrieved from http://www.atlaanz.org/research-and-publications/albany-2009-conference-proceedings-published-2010 en_NZ
unitec.institution Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology en_NZ
unitec.institution Unitec Institute of Technology en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage 84 en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage 94 en_NZ
unitec.publication.title Shifting sands, firm foundations: Proceedings of the 2009 Annual International Conference of the Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (ATLAANZ) en_NZ
unitec.conference.title Shifting Sands, Firm Foundations: Proceedings of the 2009 Annual International Conference of the Assocation of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (ATLAANZ) en_NZ
unitec.conference.org Assocation of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (ATLAANZ) en_NZ
unitec.conference.location Albany, New Zealand en_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate 2009-11-18
unitec.conference.edate 2009-11-20
unitec.peerreviewed yes en_NZ


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